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Aldi Cyclospora Bagged Salad Recall

Posted in Cyclospora,Cyclospora,Our Blog,Outbreaks & Recalls on June 29, 2020

Aldi is a well known store for getting the best grocery deals, but unfortunately they have become involved in the latest Cyclospora outbreak from their bagged salad. Here’s what we know about this Aldi Cyclospora Bagged Salad Recall:

The Recall

On June 22, 2020, ALDI, in association with Fresh Express Inc., recalled ALDI’s 12-ounce Little Salad Bar Brand Garden Salads from stores in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

On June 23, Aldi released a statement concerning the outbreak and their involvement and what they plan to do for customers who have been affected:

In cooperation with Fresh Express Inc., and out of an abundance of caution, ALDI BB #:116756 has removed Little Salad Bar Garden Salad from select stores as a precautionary measure due to possible Cyclospora infection.

The recall affects all product codes of ALDI Little Salad Bar Garden Salads with use-by dates of May 16 to July 04 and distributed in the states of Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin between May 1 and June 19.

If customers have the affected Little Salad Bar Garden Salad, they should discard it immediately.

From the Aldi Website

Our recall response

From time to time in the retail world, questions regarding a product’s quality or safety—or errors in its packaging or shipment—may arise. On those rare occasions, ALDI has a plan to swiftly and effectively remove such products from the store. A “pull-from-sale” alert from either the manufacturer of the suspect product or our own Corporate Buying Department will trigger a rapid response plan for handling recalls. Products that do not meet ALDI or government standards in any of these areas will be efficiently and effectively removed from sale.

What is Cyclospora & How Its Treated:

The CDC provides us with so much information about Cyclospora including what it is and how to treat it. 

Cyclospora cayetanensis is a parasite composed of one cell, too small to be seen without a microscope. This parasite causes an intestinal infection called cyclosporiasis.

Cyclospora is spread by people ingesting something—such as food or water—that was contaminated with feces (stool). Cyclospora needs time (typically, at least 1–2 weeks) after being passed in a bowel movement to become infectious for another person. Therefore, it is unlikely that Cyclospora is passed directly from one person to another.

If not treated, the illness may last from a few days to a month or longer. Symptoms may seem to go away and then return one or more times (relapse). It’s common to feel very tired.

Your health care provider will ask you to submit stool specimens to see if you are infected. You might be asked to submit more than one specimen from different days. Identification of this parasite in stool requires special laboratory tests that are not routinely done. Therefore, if indicated, your health care provider should specifically request testing for Cyclospora. In addition, your health care provider might have your stool checked for other organisms that can cause similar symptoms.

The recommended treatment is a combination of two antibiotics, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, also known as Bactrim, Septra, or Cotrim. People who have diarrhea should also rest and drink plenty of fluids.

No highly effective alternative drugs have been identified yet for people with Cyclospora infection who are unable to take sulfa drugs. See your health care provider to discuss potential options.

Avoiding food or water that might have been contaminated with stool may help prevent Cyclospora infection.

Consumers and retailers should always follow safe fruit and vegetable handling recommendations:

Wash: Wash hands with soap and warm water before and after handling or preparing fruits and vegetables. Wash cutting boards, dishes, utensils, and counter tops with soap and hot water between the preparation of raw meat, poultry, and seafood products and the preparation of fruits and vegetables that will not be cooked.

Prepare: Wash all fruits and vegetables thoroughly under running water before eating, cutting, or cooking. Fruits and vegetables that are labeled “prewashed” do not need to be washed again at home. Scrub firm fruits and vegetables, such as melons and cucumbers, with a clean produce brush. Cut away any damaged or bruised areas on fruits and vegetables before preparing and eating.

Store: Refrigerate cut, peeled, or cooked fruits and vegetables as soon as possible, or within 2 hours. Store fruits and vegetables away from raw meat, poultry, and seafood.

The Lange Law Firm 

Our mission is to help families who have been harmed by contaminated food or water.  When corporations cause Cyclospora food poisoning outbreaks or Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks, we use the law to hold them accountable.  The Lange Law Firm, PLLC is the only law firm in the nation solely focused on representing families in food poisoning lawsuits and Legionnaires disease lawsuits.

If you or your child was infected with Cyclospora or any other parasite and are interested in making a legal claim for compensation, we have a Cyclospora lawyer ready to help you.  Call us for a free no obligation legal consultation at (833) 330-3663 or send us an e-mail here.

By: Samantha Cooper