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Wendy’s Romaine the Cause of Ecoli Outbreak in 4 States?

Posted in E. coli,Our Blog,Outbreaks & Recalls on August 19, 2022

Is Wendy’s Romaine the Cause of Ecoli in 4 States? Well, Wendy’s is removing romaine lettuce from its sandwiches in some of its restaurants because it has been linked to a multistate outbreak of infections caused by E. coli. Here’s what we know about this potential Wendys Romaine Ecoli Outbreak:

Wendys Romaine Ecoli Outbreak in Michigan

Michigan health officials have confirmed 43 cases of E. coli that match the strain (E. coli O157) in a multi-state outbreak.

More than 55% of the outbreak cases reported eating food at a Wendy’s restaurant. A specific food has not yet been identified as the source, but officials are focusing on sandwiches topped with romaine lettuce.

There is no recommendation to avoid eating at Wendy’s and the restaurant is working with local public health departments to remove certain products.

The illness onset dates range from late July through early August. Outbreak cases have been reported in the following counties: Allegan, Branch, Clinton, Genesee, Gratiot, Jackson, Kent, Macomb, Midland, Monroe, Muskegon, Oakland, Ogemaw, Ottawa, Saginaw, Washtenaw, and Wayne and the City of Detroit.

The people who have experienced illness have ranged in age from 6 to 94 years old. Among the Michigan outbreak cases, 56% have been hospitalized. Four cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a severe complication that occurs in some people diagnosed with STEC infection, have been identified.

Wendys Romaine Ecoli Outbreak in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has been added to the increasing list of E. coli cases reported around the country.

Thirty-seven people across Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania have been infected by the outbreak.

A specific food has not yet been confirmed as a source of the outbreak, but most of the sick people reported eating sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants before feeling ill.

Wendys Romaine Ecoli Outbreak in Indiana

Indiana is now part of an E. coli outbreak spiking in surrounding states, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC reports 37 people infected in the outbreak in four states including Indiana, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Ohio. Nine people have been hospitalized with a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome. No deaths have been reported.

A specific food has not been identified, but the CDC reports most of the sickened people reported eating sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants before getting sick. Of the 26 people interviewed so far, 22 had eaten at Wendy’s in the week prior to getting sick.

The CDC said Wendy’s is taking the precautionary measure of removing the romaine lettuce being used in sandwiches from restaurants in the region. Wendy’s uses a different type of romaine lettuce for salads.

Investigators are working to confirm whether romaine lettuce is the source of this outbreak, and whether romaine lettuce served at Wendy’s restaurants was served or sold at other businesses.

To prevent getting sick, the CDC recommends people follow four steps when handling and preparing food: clean, separate, cook and chill. Infections are commonly spread through contaminated food or water.

The CDC is asking those with symptoms of E. coli to write down the food they ate during the week of their sickness, report the illness to a local and state health department and answer questions from public health officials.

Wendys Romaine Ecoli Outbreak in Ohio

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified more people in new states infected from an outbreak of E. coli.

In an update Friday, the CDC said there are now 37 people sick in four states – Ohio (19), Michigan (15), Pennsylvania (2) and Indiana (1) – from the strain of E. coli O157.

Ten people have been hospitalized, including three in Michigan who have a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome. No deaths have been reported.

The CDC said a specific food has not yet been confirmed as the source of the outbreak, but most reported eating sandwiches with romaine lettuce at Wendy’s restaurants before getting sick.

Among 26 people interviewed, 22 reported eating at a Wendy’s in the week before their illness started.

The CDC on Wendys Romaine Ecoli Outbreak

The Wendy’s restaurants where sick people ate are in Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, according to the CDC. The sick person in Indiana has not been interviewed.

The CDC said Wendy’s is taking the precautionary measure of removing the romaine lettuce being used on sandwiches from restaurants in that region. A different type of lettuce is used for salads.

Additionally, the CDC is not advising people to avoid eating at Wendy’s restaurants or stop eating romaine lettuce.

To prevent getting sick, the CDC recommends people follow four steps when handling and preparing food: clean, separate, cook and chill. Infections are commonly spread through contaminated food or water.

The CDC is asking those with symptoms of E. coli to write down the food they ate during the week of their sickness, report the illness to a local and state health department and answer questions from public health officials.

If you are experiencing any of these severe E. coli symptoms, please call a healthcare provider:

  • Diarrhea and a fever higher than 102°F
  • Diarrhea that lasts more than 3 days and is not improving
  • Bloody diarrhea
  • So much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down
  • Signs of dehydration, such as:
    • Not peeing much
    • Dry mouth and throat
    • Feeling dizzy when standing up

The CDC has provided the following information on E. coli:

  • Symptoms of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection vary for each person, but often include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some people may have a fever, which usually is not very high (less than 101˚F/38.5˚C).
  • Most people get better within 5 to 7 days. Some infections are very mild, but others are severe or even life-threatening.
  • Most people with a STEC infection start feeling sick 3 to 4 days after eating or drinking something that contains the bacteria. However, illnesses can start anywhere from 1 to 10 days after exposure.
  • Contact your healthcare provider if you have severe symptoms of E. coli, such as diarrhea that lasts for more than 3 days or diarrhea that is accompanied by a fever higher than 102˚F, bloody diarrhea, or so much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down and are not peeing much.

How The Lange Law Firm Can Help

Our mission is to help families who have been harmed by contaminated food or water.  When corporations cause Ecoli food poisoning outbreaks, we use the law to hold them accountable.  The Lange Law Firm is one of the only law firms in the nation focused on representing families in food poisoning lawsuits.

If you got sick in this Wendy’s Romaine Ecoli Outbreak and are interested in making a legal claim for compensation, we can help. We want you to know that an E coli Lawyer at the Lange Law Firm, PLLC is currently investigating this matter and offering free legal consultations.

Our lawyer, Jory Lange became a lawyer to help make our communities and families safer. Anyone who was infected with E coli may be entitled to compensation for their injuries.  To learn more about the Wendy’s Romaine Ecoli Outbreak or making an E coli food poisoning claim, please contact the Lange Law Firm, PLLC by phone or contact us online.